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Monthly Archives: May 2017

Wheatgrass Juice Benefits

This grass is wheat in its early stages and once the grass reaches about seven or eight days it is at its optimal stage to be picked and juiced. The juice must be drunk as soon after juicing as possible to ensure that you receive the most nutritional rewards from your hard work. Chlorophyll contains high levels of oxygen and is responsible for keeping plants oxygenated.

For many people wheatgrass juice is viewed as having powers of rejuvenation, it has been called the plasma of youth as well as the life blood of plants and thereby being extremely beneficial to humans. If you look at all the elements that are absent in your body’s cells, there will be the realization that all of these, especially hormones, enzymes, nucleic acids and vitamins can all be regained by drinking the juice of this green health injection on a regular basis.

Over the years wheatgrass juice has displayed a very beneficial effect on many people who consume it on a regular basis. These beneficial effects have been shown to be both many and varied. Wheatgrass has been shown to cleanse the lymph system leaving the body in a far cleaner state than prior to the intake of wheatgrass juice. This juice has also demonstrated that it has the power to help build levels of oxygen and nutrients in the blood. Juicing wheatgrass also gives you access to a liquid that will help to restore balance to your body by removing the toxic metals that reside in your cells and your liver and kidneys will feel the wheatgrass’ nourishing and vitality restorative properties.

There are many juicers out there that will provide you with the means to juice your wheatgrass adequately and you will receive benefits from your juice, but in order to ensure that you receive the maximum beneficial effects from your wheatgrass juice, you need to use a juicer specifically engineered for juicing wheatgrass.

Since wheatgrass is very leafy it requires a different type of juicer to most fruit and vegetables. The best juicer to use is a masticating juicer that is built to handle wheatgrass because wheatgrass needs to be crushed to get the most nutrients out of your produce. I addition to juicing with the appropriate machine it is recommended that you grow your own wheatgrass so that you can be sure that you are drinking juice that has been made from wheatgrass that has been picked at the optimal time and juiced within a reasonable to ensure that you get a super drink from all the produce you juice.

 

Know the Reason Why High Choline Foods May Be Good For Your Blood

Choline is an essential nutrient but not, strictly speaking, a vitamin although it is often mistakenly thought of as a member of the B complex, with which it has numerous functions in common. Choline should be found in abundance in a normally healthy diet, but deficiencies have been linked with cardiovascular and liver disease, as well as impaired cognitive function.

Until as recently as 1998 it was believed that the body could manufacture an adequate supply of choline from the closely associated nutrients, vitamin B12 and folic acid. It is now accepted, however, that although the body can indeed synthesise choline in limited quantities, an adequate supply from the daily diet is also required for the avoidance of a number of potentially serious deficiency conditions and diseases.

Most choline in the body is contained in the phospholipids, a particular type of fat molecule of which the most common, phosphatidylcholine, more commonly known as lecithin, is also an important dietary source of choline. Choline is known to be crucial for the proper functioning of the brain’s neurotransmitters, and in the form of lecithin is an important element in the composition of cell membranes and effective biochemical communication between cells.

Lecithin, moreover, is vital for the liver’s ability to break down fat and cholesterol into the “Very Low Density Lipoproteins” (VLDLs) which are carried around the body in the bloodstream. Any deficiency of choline or lecithin may therefore result in the liver becoming unable to metabolise dietary fat and cholesterol in this way, and the resulting accumulation may lead to the condition known as “fatty liver” and ultimately perhaps to serious liver disease. Some research even suggests that the changes in the liver brought about by choline deficiency may lead to an increased risk of liver cancer, although not all authorities regard this research as conclusive.

VLDLs are also necessary for the production of the High Density Lipoproteins (HDLs), the so-called “good cholesterol”, which is generally recognised as a significant protector against cardiovascular disease. There is also some evidence, although the research is not yet universally accepted, that choline may assist in the breaking down of homocysteine, a naturally occurring protein within the body, which is strongly associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

These protective effects may appear somewhat paradoxical, because the milk, eggs and liver which are the richest food sources of choline have been condemned in the past for the amounts of supposedly dangerous cholesterol they introduce to the body. A small (3oz) serving of beef liver, for example, will provide more than 350 mg of choline, and a single large egg perhaps 125 mg or more. So strict vegetarians who adopt a low fat, and supposedly low cholesterol diet which excludes these choline rich foods, may paradoxically be placing their cardiovascular health at risk.

Fortunately, however, this is a relatively simple problem to resolve, as supplies of lecithin manufactured from soy beans are readily available from health food stores. A single teaspoon (3.5g) of the granular supplement may provide around 130 mg of choline and is reasonably palatable when sprinkled in suitable drinks or on cereals. Peanuts and wheatgerm are also useful vegetarian sources.

To put the quantities mentioned above in some kind of context: the US Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) has recommended an “Adequate Intake” amount for choline of 550 mg a day, or a mere 4-5 teaspoons of granular lecithin and it has been estimated that most adults are able to obtain between 700 and 1,000 mg a day from a normally healthy diet. Caution should be exercised, however, in the treatment of the FNB recommendation which appears to have been set at the lowest level necessary to avoid liver damage. And it may be noted also that the 700 mg figure for the lower end of the range of normal intake seems perilously close to the 550 mg a day regarded as adequate by the FNB.

But the avoidance of serious damage to a vital organ is, to put it mildly, the very minimum one would reasonably expect of a “healthy” diet, and a very long way indeed from the optimum health which nutritional practitioners insist should be the aim.

For example, although conventional medicine remains reluctant to accept the link as proven, there is some evidence that choline in amounts of up to 1g can improve cognitive function and particularly memory. Choline is known to act as a stimulant to the production of essential neurotransmitting chemicals, and there is also some evidence that high intakes during pregnancy may encourage optimal development of the foetal brain and nervous system.

Although the possible reasons are not fully understood, there is also good evidence that high doses of choline may significantly improve athletic performance in long distance endurance events such as marathon or triathlon.

So given that the FNB has established 3.5 grams (ie 3,500 mg) a day as the upper safe limit for choline intake before any potential (and minor) side-effects might be encountered, and that choline cannot be stored in the body, there seems no reason not to aim for an intake well in excess of the recommended minimum or “adequate” amount.

 

About Omega Fatty Acids

The most common buzz word these days is the idea of Omega fatty acids or essential fatty acids. These chemical structures are things that the body needs in order to maintain cellular health as well as to prevent inflammation in the body. They also help to maintain the integrity of the nervous system in addition to making sure the body is free from certain illnesses. Studies have linked Omega fatty acids with prevention of cancer, limiting disease growth, as well as helping with mental health disorders. These EFAs (essential fatty acids) can not be produced by the body, so they need to be ingested through the diet or in a supplement form.

There are three different kinds of Omega fatty acids that you will hear about – Omega 3, 6, and 9. Each of these numbers designates that chemical structure, with each ascending number as the longer chain that needs to be broken down by the body. But how they are chemically constructed is usually not the most important point for the everyday person. People want to know what these Omega fatty acids will do for their body.

What Does Omega 3 Do for the Body?

Omega 3 fatty acids are those that are found in oily fishes and in fish oil supplements. These fatty acids are responsible for helping the body create developed neural networks – simply put, they help to build brain power in children as well as adults. Research in the UK has shown that children given EFAs are more likely to score higher on reading tests as well as improve their overall behaviour. Omega 3s are linked with helping those with ADD and ADHD as well, in addition to a variety of other mental health disorders likes OCD and depression. In relation to inflammation in the body, Omega 3 fatty acids can also assist those with arthritis and other autoimmune disorders.

Recent studies from Harvard University have also suggested that Omega 3 fatty acids can also help with high blood pressure and other forms of heart disease. Cancer prevention is another commonly listed benefit of Omega 3 fatty acids.

What Does Omega 6 Do for the Body?

Omega 6 fatty acids are those found in plant sources like nuts and flax seeds. These essential fatty acids have many of the same benefits as Omega 3 fatty acids, but they are not as widely encouraged as those from fish sources.

These fatty acids will still help with inflammation in relation to arthritis and autoimmune diseases, but these EFAs are more commonly referred to in terms of their effect on the skin and hair of the person taking them. Studies have shown that the fatty acids can help to manage acne as well as conditions like psoriasis. Women especially can benefit from Omega 6 fatty acids as they can also help with menstrual disorders and related symptoms.

What Does Omega 9 Do for the Body?

Like its other essential fatty acid family members, Omega 9 fatty acids have a large role to play in relation to the health of the patient. Found in animal fat and vegetable oils, these fatty acids aren’t linked as much with health benefits, but still, they should be a part of a healthy diet.

Cancer prevention as well as heart protection are still possible with Omega 9 fatty acids, but these should be a much smaller part of your diet as they can also include saturated fats, which are harmful to the heart in larger quantities.

How to Get More Essential Fatty Acids in Your Diet

It’s simple to get more Omega fatty acids in your diet if you simply look to where the greatest sources of essential fatty acids are – fishes, flaxseed, and animal fats. By simply making sure to have a few servings of these items each week, you will be able to maintain a healthy level of protection for your body and the stresses it goes through each day.

To make things easier, fish oil supplements are a great way to get the right levels and balance of Omega 3, 6, and 9 in your diet. These pills are easy to take, easy to digest and simple to